Tag Archive for Court Theatre

Shine a Light

Intellectually invigorating and emotionally stimulating, Court Theatre’s presentation of “Skylight” offers the audience an attractive and slightly provocative invitation to reflect on social and moral values and the role that class plays in relationships. Written by David Hare and directed…

Dark Harmonies

Staging James Joyce’s moody short story “The Dead” as a holiday musical shouldn’t work. The story, after all, though set at an annual holiday gathering, ends up as one of the most foreboding and darkly poignant pieces in his collection Dubliners.…

A Night Out or a Call to Action

About forty-five minutes into act one of “Jitney” at Court Theatre, the man sitting next to me fell asleep. He was a big guy, and, when his breathing relaxed and his eyes closed, our knees pressed together. He snored. Not…

After the Millennium Approached

Roy M. Cohn is not a homosexual. As the high-powered lawyer explains in part one of Tony Kushner’s “Angels in America,” yes, he sleeps with men, and, yes, he appears to have AIDS (heretofore to be referred to only as…

High Visibility

“I am an invisible man.” To begin a play with that phrase can’t help but raise expectations. Court Theatre’s current run of “Invisible Man” has especially high expectations to reckon with, owing to both the long history of the celebrated…

A Thousand Ships

“An Iliad” tells the story of the last few weeks of the war, when the Acheans Agamemnon and Achilles are fighting over a woman, Briseis. Achilles loses Briseis and refuses to fight in the war. As the struggle within the Achean ranks unfolds, the war wages on outside the walls of Troy.

It Ain’t Necessarily So

When it first debuted in 1935, the Gershwin brothers’ ”Porgy and Bess” raised one of the biggest stinks in musical theater history. With its controversial portrayal of love in an impoverished African-American community, the work was famously decried by academic Harold Cruse as “the most contradictory cultural symbol the Western world has ever created,” and branded by Langston Hughes as a stereotypical, unrealistic account of black coastal life.